A tisket, a tasket: This Easter, think outside the basket

The recipe for dying Easter eggs is simple: 1/2 cup boiling water, 1 teaspoon vinegar and about 10 drops of food coloring will create the perfect pot of color. But when it comes to displaying these bright beauties, style-savvy decorators will want to go beyond the standard plastic basket. These clever ideas are super simple, and many are as close as your kitchen pantry.
 

1. Candlesticks  

Use candlesticks of varying heights as "pillars" for eggs; the indentations eliminate wobbling. Try for candlesticks in identical materials—glass, painted wood, silver—for a cohesive look.

2. Cornucopia

Who says Thanksgiving has a monopoly on this horn of plenty? Fill a wicker cornucopia with dyed eggs for the look of springtime bounty.

3. Silver bowls

Raid your china cabinet for silver-toned vessels—Revere bowls, porridge servers, wine coasters, votive holders—and fill and top them with dyed eggs.

4. Rustic container

From wooden storage crates to wire market baskets to fishing creels, a rough-edged vessel is an unexpectedly stunning contrast to glossy-smooth eggs.

5. Egg cups

Gather a dozen or so plain egg cups (restaurant supply stores are a great source) and place a dyed egg in each.

6. Bird’s nest

Group a small cluster of eggs in an artificial bird’s nest, available at craft stores.

7. Egg cartons

For a casual picnic-style Easter, place your dyed creations in plain cardboard egg cartons; cut the lids off for a finished look.

8. Cake stand

If you own a cake stand with a tall edge, fill it with eggs for an elevated arrangement. A tiered cupcake server makes another fine display.

9. Galvanized pots

Line small galvanized pots with shredded newsprint or colored paper and carefully fill with eggs. Place them in a line down your feasting table for a looks that's chic and charming.